{"id":"29136748","type":"news","source":"CP","title":"Sweet, honeybee program adding a little buzz to Vancouver's streets","publish_date":"2014-07-14T22:16:00Z","author":"The Canadian Press","category":"agriculture","category_title":"Agriculture","teaser":"VANCOUVER - Beekeepers and a developer have teamed up on a sweet idea that they hope will add buzz to the streets of Vancouver.\nA 540-square metre community garden owned by the developer Amacon near Chinatown has become the city's latest pollinator sanctuary and is now home to two honeybee hives. ","body":"VANCOUVER - Beekeepers and a developer have teamed up on a sweet idea that they hope will add buzz to the streets of Vancouver.\nA 540-square metre community garden owned by the developer Amacon near Chinatown has become the city's latest pollinator sanctuary and is now home to two honeybee hives. \nSarah Common of the non-profit group Hives for Humanity says pollinators, like bees, are responsible for two third of everything people eat, but their populations are suffering because of habitat loss and agricultural practises that rely on chemicals.\nShe says her group hopes the project at Milross Gardens demonstrates innovative ways to use space and create pollinator sanctuaries.\nCommon says her group also hopes to create corridors throughout the city, so bees can move about and connect with other bees.\nMelissa Howey who works for Amacon says Hives for Humanity is helping to beautify the space, and the gardens will now be home to free, Monday night beekeeping workshops."}

NATIONAL

Sweet, honeybee program adding a little buzz to Vancouver's streets

VANCOUVER - Beekeepers and a developer have teamed up on a sweet idea that they hope will add buzz to the streets of Vancouver.

A 540-square metre community garden owned by the developer Amacon near Chinatown has become the city's latest pollinator sanctuary and is now home to two honeybee hives.

Sarah Common of the non-profit group Hives for Humanity says pollinators, like bees, are responsible for two third of everything people eat, but their populations are suffering because of habitat loss and agricultural practises that rely on chemicals.

She says her group hopes the project at Milross Gardens demonstrates innovative ways to use space and create pollinator sanctuaries.

Common says her group also hopes to create corridors throughout the city, so bees can move about and connect with other bees.

Melissa Howey who works for Amacon says Hives for Humanity is helping to beautify the space, and the gardens will now be home to free, Monday night beekeeping workshops.

NATIONAL

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